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 Winter Walk

  STAGE BY STAGE

It's that time of year when it starts to get cold, but also as a painter, even the cold months have their beauty. To start the session off, here's a nice little snow scene, and you know I really can't believe it's a year since we started these articles. I remember the first one we started being a winter scene. I am starting off with a very simple outline drawing and a sky wash of ultramarine blue taking out the clouds with a damp brush and drop in a mixture of ultramarine blue and light red, in the bottom bits of the clouds. It's worth noting that you use ultramarine blue for colder skies and cobalt blue for warmer skies.
   

Essential Supplies

The items you will need to complete this scene are as follows:-

Watercolour Paint
 
Burnt Sienna
Yellow Ochre
Raw Umber
Cobalt Blue
Ultramarine Blue

Alizarin Crimson
Brushes
 
1.5" Wash brush
3/4" Wash brush
No.8 Round
No.3 Rigger

1


 

I didnít start and paint around my foreground trees with the sky wash, instead I painted through them and then just with the squeezed out ĺ" wash brush, draw out the paint to form the foreground trees.

 

Whilst the base of my sky wash was still slightly wet, I dropped in a mixture of ultramarine blue and burnt sienna using my No.8 round brush for the more distant trees and also that big clump of trees on the right-hand side, but this time making the mixture a little bit darker by adding a tiny touch of raw umber into the wet paint.

2

3

Now whilst this clump on the right-hand side is still damp, again with my mixture of ultramarine blue and burnt sienna Iím going to add a few tiny touches giving the impression of a few trees in amongst it.

For the middle distance which I left white, Iíve left some criss-crossy bits, and still using a mixture of ultramarine blue and burnt sienna. Add a little bit of burnt sienna into the middle distance hedgerow before again going on with my ultramarine blue and burnt sienna mix.  Notice Iím not leaving too much white. 

Now coming to the big foreground trees, what Iíve found is it's always better to exaggerate the darkness of foreground trees slightly. So Iím going straight in with a mixture of ultramarine blue and burnt sienna, practically black.

All of these trees are done with my rigger brush, but donít try to hold it all stiff and tight, itís a lovely flick bouncy brush.

Also into these trees I've put a tiny touch of burnt sienna.

For the hedges either side, I'm using a No.8 round brush and just stroking in a little bit of very wet burnt sienna. 

A tiny touch of raw umber here and there.  In the track I'm just going to add a little bit of ultramarine blue and burnt sienna mixed fairly dark, but not black, for a few tracks here and there.

4

5

And so now it's time for the figure, for which I'm using ultramarine blue and burnt sienna mixed as a black. This is for a little blob for the head.  Now a touch of alizarin crimson for the jacket and again ultramarine blue and burnt sienna for the legs. For the dog again ultramarine blue and burnt sienna as a black, this is just literally a couple of squares with a couple of sticks.

Finally it's shadow time. Again ultramarine blue and burnt sienna, but fairly weak and heavier on the blue.  There we go a very simple little snow scene which should start the painting season off nicely. And there is our first year of articles for the 'Culture' magazine over in the blink of an eye. I look forward to showing you some more painting tips in 2006.